1970s colours

all editorials

1970s colours

Is minimalism over? Is sobriety forgotten? The bright colours that marked the 1970s are back, with purple and orange leading the way. They’re here to inject our wardrobes with an exuberance that’s sometimes missing. And as a bonus, they come with strong, graphic shapes that make a nice change from current-day gloom.

In France, where black, navy blue and beige have ruled for a long time, this explosion of unexpected colours feels like a small cultural revolution.

Yes, restraint is now de rigueur, but is that a reason to apply it to what we wear? “No!” Is the unanimous response from designers and consumers. This season it’s more about making a strong impact with big bursts of flashy colour. We thought those colours were stuck in the 70s, forever part of our fading photos from a long-gone past and never to return. But, ta-da, orange, purple, lime green, turquoise blue and vivid yellow are making triumphant comebacks. Rich with the sweet nostalgia that haunts our imaginations, they’re showing up everywhere – in small touches but especially in total looks or bold combinations. Who saw it coming? Did French singers Clara Luciani and Juliette Armanet, armed with their retro disco-pop, unknowingly set up the revival of these until-recently banished colours? Is there a “Gucci effect”? The Italian brand has invested a lot of energy in bringing 1970’s exuberance and opulence back to centre stage. Whatever the reason, the fashion world is thrilled!

At DA/DA, Diane Ducasse dares using flamboyant purples and oranges for her famous pantsuits. Balzac Paris presents sweaters in lime green and intense purple, and Patine chooses orchid purple for a sweatshirt. Since she started, Elisa Chalmin has been known for her use of colour, and this season she explores mauves that flirt with violet or canary yellow. And finally, Chloé Stora delivers a purple velvet skirt straight out of Carnaby Street. Damn! In France, where black, navy blue and beige have ruled for a long time, this explosion of unexpected colours feels like a small cultural revolution.

And social media platforms are certainly not unfamiliar with the trend – slowly but surely, almost behind our backs, they have shaped our perception. They’ve made us demanding and eager for dramatic, graphic looks. And so, what seduces social media easily goes on to colonise real life, since our eyes have gotten used to every visual extravagance. In the street, influencers and other style setters are very skilled at putting these brilliant tones to good use, attracting photographers’ attention. In real life, as well, we know that high-energy colours are precious allies against dull complexions, feeling sad … and blending in with the crowd.

What’s better than orange, the symbol of optimism, happiness, and energy, for breaking away from the doldrums that surround us? And the same is true for purple; it’s not the happiest colour, but since it gets people talking and choosing sides, it represents originality. The bravest can try and mix everything up, making sure they match their look with their home decor. It will be easy, since the colour revolution is also taking over our houses and walls. Winter will be psychedelic!

Thomas Zylberman, trends specialist with the Carlin Creative trends bureau, breaks down the trend.

“Colour, even when it’s shocking, has always been a relatively easy tool for designers. They can use it to express a change in tone or season without having to rework entire silhouettes, cuts etc. The same is true for customers who can create a radical look without spending much. Today, the best bets for these shots of colour are pieces with impact, such as wool coats or blazers. This wave of colours (recently considered tacky) is being used on quality fabrics with appeal, such as satin, velvet, and wool broadcloth. The result is a cosy, rather chic mood. The idea is really about having fun, moving away from a slightly sad minimalism, and embracing a reassuring nostalgia.”

Image Title

© Chloé Stora

Image Title

© DA/DA, Diane Ducasse

Image Title

© Balzac Paris

Image Title

© Patine Paris

all editorials

1970s colours

Is minimalism over? Is sobriety forgotten? The bright colours that marked the 1970s are back, with purple and orange leading the way. They’re here to inject our wardrobes with an exuberance that’s sometimes missing. And as a bonus, they come with strong, graphic shapes that make a nice change from current-day gloom.

In France, where black, navy blue and beige have ruled for a long time, this explosion of unexpected colours feels like a small cultural revolution.

Yes, restraint is now de rigueur, but is that a reason to apply it to what we wear? “No!” Is the unanimous response from designers and consumers. This season it’s more about making a strong impact with big bursts of flashy colour. We thought those colours were stuck in the 70s, forever part of our fading photos from a long-gone past and never to return. But, ta-da, orange, purple, lime green, turquoise blue and vivid yellow are making triumphant comebacks. Rich with the sweet nostalgia that haunts our imaginations, they’re showing up everywhere – in small touches but especially in total looks or bold combinations. Who saw it coming? Did French singers Clara Luciani and Juliette Armanet, armed with their retro disco-pop, unknowingly set up the revival of these until-recently banished colours? Is there a “Gucci effect”? The Italian brand has invested a lot of energy in bringing 1970’s exuberance and opulence back to centre stage. Whatever the reason, the fashion world is thrilled!

At DA/DA, Diane Ducasse dares using flamboyant purples and oranges for her famous pantsuits. Balzac Paris presents sweaters in lime green and intense purple, and Patine chooses orchid purple for a sweatshirt. Since she started, Elisa Chalmin has been known for her use of colour, and this season she explores mauves that flirt with violet or canary yellow. And finally, Chloé Stora delivers a purple velvet skirt straight out of Carnaby Street. Damn! In France, where black, navy blue and beige have ruled for a long time, this explosion of unexpected colours feels like a small cultural revolution.

And social media platforms are certainly not unfamiliar with the trend – slowly but surely, almost behind our backs, they have shaped our perception. They’ve made us demanding and eager for dramatic, graphic looks. And so, what seduces social media easily goes on to colonise real life, since our eyes have gotten used to every visual extravagance. In the street, influencers and other style setters are very skilled at putting these brilliant tones to good use, attracting photographers’ attention. In real life, as well, we know that high-energy colours are precious allies against dull complexions, feeling sad … and blending in with the crowd.

What’s better than orange, the symbol of optimism, happiness, and energy, for breaking away from the doldrums that surround us? And the same is true for purple; it’s not the happiest colour, but since it gets people talking and choosing sides, it represents originality. The bravest can try and mix everything up, making sure they match their look with their home decor. It will be easy, since the colour revolution is also taking over our houses and walls. Winter will be psychedelic!

Thomas Zylberman, trends specialist with the Carlin Creative trends bureau, breaks down the trend.

“Colour, even when it’s shocking, has always been a relatively easy tool for designers. They can use it to express a change in tone or season without having to rework entire silhouettes, cuts etc. The same is true for customers who can create a radical look without spending much. Today, the best bets for these shots of colour are pieces with impact, such as wool coats or blazers. This wave of colours (recently considered tacky) is being used on quality fabrics with appeal, such as satin, velvet, and wool broadcloth. The result is a cosy, rather chic mood. The idea is really about having fun, moving away from a slightly sad minimalism, and embracing a reassuring nostalgia.”

Image Title
Image Title
Image Title
Image Title