50 shades of nude

all editorials

50 shades of nude

For a long time judged as upper class or even slightly boring, beige is now making a big comeback in a cool and sensual version. Also called “nude”, the shade has more meaning than it seems and says as much about our need for restraint as our desire to opt for clothing with timeless elegance. 

There’s the desire for a reassuring, timeless aesthetic that can help us overcome the upsets of the modern world.

2023 will be understated or not at all! The proof? Fashion’s sensational (if we can use that word) return to minimalism is built around all the beige shades. Everywhere you look, putty, chalk, sand, caramel, and jute are the new belles of the ball. Who saw it coming? We enjoy these tones as a total look, and they’re a guarantee of “quiet luxury”, a trending concept that communicates low-key chic. But, more surprising, we also like them for a relaxed or sporty vibe, like Kim Kardashian’s body-hugging designs for her Skims brand. It seems like a long time ago that this so-simple nude was the safe bet for a certain straight-laced elite, whose icon will always be the late Carolyn Bessette. Or, in a recent version, it’s Gwyneth Paltrow defending herself in court with impressive bravura while wearing gradations of cream tones. But today nude is warm and inclusive, it’s for everyone.

Maison Kitsuné presents T-shirts and hoodies in a pale, luminous beige. At Sessùn, a brand we know loves earth and natural tones, fluid pants and tight-fitting dresses give an almost second-skin effect. It’s the same at Soeur. Since the brand’s beginning, minimalism has been at the heart of its DNA, and dresses and blouses in cotton voile have ultra-understated style. Ba&sh delivers impeccable pantsuits in milk chocolate, and Chloé Stora creates the ultimate blazer in an almost-terracotta tone. In short, the palette range is vast so it can flatter every skin tone and fulfil all the era’s aspirations.

First, there’s the desire for a reassuring, timeless aesthetic that can help us overcome the upsets of the modern world. In this case, fashion is echoing the home decor sector, so Scandinavian minimalism can be both inside a home and on our bodies. And next, the push is back to return clothing to its central role and celebrate well-cut garments in appealing, flattering materials. This is a far cry from the collection artifices that are sometimes more for social media than real life. Could we be seeing the end of a kind of super-instagrammable fashion?

In any case, it’s more often about putting money into sound, even safe, investments. And it’s about choosing pieces that work well and provide a certain, immediate charm, but that are also, more sensibly, easy to resell if needed. The second-hand boom, which includes the luxury industry, is probably reshuffling the deck. Because what we want to buy today is, on one hand, something timeless we’ll want to wear for a long time, but also an item we can easily put back on the market. The takeaway: not necessarily the latest capsule-collaboration that’s super trendy but with a short shelf life. So, does the arrival of beige signal the end of trends? Nothing is less certain, but until we once again fall for fluorescents and sequins, why not enjoy this moment of elegance and simplicity?

Thomas Zylberman, Stylist and Trend Expert with Carlin Creative, explains.

“Beige has recently replaced grey. And in doing so, its status has changed: instead of an upper class symbol, it has become slightly sensual, or, in any case, sexy and surprising. The entire iconography has changed. It’s no longer boring at all, thanks especially to celebrities like the Kardashians, Gigi and Bella Hadid, and Hailey Bieber, who love it and have helped make it mainstream. Beige coats no longer rule, nude has taken over sweatpants, satin bra tops, and close-fitting Lycra dresses! There’s a greater choice of fabrics, both matte and shiny. However, the colour isn’t easy to pair with others and is more easily worn in a monochrome total look.”

Image Title

© Soeur

Image Title

© Sessun

Image Title

© Chloé Stora

Image Title

© Bash

Image Title

© Kitsuné

all editorials

50 shades of nude

For a long time judged as upper class or even slightly boring, beige is now making a big comeback in a cool and sensual version. Also called “nude”, the shade has more meaning than it seems and says as much about our need for restraint as our desire to opt for clothing with timeless elegance. 

There’s the desire for a reassuring, timeless aesthetic that can help us overcome the upsets of the modern world.

2023 will be understated or not at all! The proof? Fashion’s sensational (if we can use that word) return to minimalism is built around all the beige shades. Everywhere you look, putty, chalk, sand, caramel, and jute are the new belles of the ball. Who saw it coming? We enjoy these tones as a total look, and they’re a guarantee of “quiet luxury”, a trending concept that communicates low-key chic. But, more surprising, we also like them for a relaxed or sporty vibe, like Kim Kardashian’s body-hugging designs for her Skims brand. It seems like a long time ago that this so-simple nude was the safe bet for a certain straight-laced elite, whose icon will always be the late Carolyn Bessette. Or, in a recent version, it’s Gwyneth Paltrow defending herself in court with impressive bravura while wearing gradations of cream tones. But today nude is warm and inclusive, it’s for everyone.

Maison Kitsuné presents T-shirts and hoodies in a pale, luminous beige. At Sessùn, a brand we know loves earth and natural tones, fluid pants and tight-fitting dresses give an almost second-skin effect. It’s the same at Soeur. Since the brand’s beginning, minimalism has been at the heart of its DNA, and dresses and blouses in cotton voile have ultra-understated style. Ba&sh delivers impeccable pantsuits in milk chocolate, and Chloé Stora creates the ultimate blazer in an almost-terracotta tone. In short, the palette range is vast so it can flatter every skin tone and fulfil all the era’s aspirations.

First, there’s the desire for a reassuring, timeless aesthetic that can help us overcome the upsets of the modern world. In this case, fashion is echoing the home decor sector, so Scandinavian minimalism can be both inside a home and on our bodies. And next, the push is back to return clothing to its central role and celebrate well-cut garments in appealing, flattering materials. This is a far cry from the collection artifices that are sometimes more for social media than real life. Could we be seeing the end of a kind of super-instagrammable fashion?

In any case, it’s more often about putting money into sound, even safe, investments. And it’s about choosing pieces that work well and provide a certain, immediate charm, but that are also, more sensibly, easy to resell if needed. The second-hand boom, which includes the luxury industry, is probably reshuffling the deck. Because what we want to buy today is, on one hand, something timeless we’ll want to wear for a long time, but also an item we can easily put back on the market. The takeaway: not necessarily the latest capsule-collaboration that’s super trendy but with a short shelf life. So, does the arrival of beige signal the end of trends? Nothing is less certain, but until we once again fall for fluorescents and sequins, why not enjoy this moment of elegance and simplicity?

Thomas Zylberman, Stylist and Trend Expert with Carlin Creative, explains.

“Beige has recently replaced grey. And in doing so, its status has changed: instead of an upper class symbol, it has become slightly sensual, or, in any case, sexy and surprising. The entire iconography has changed. It’s no longer boring at all, thanks especially to celebrities like the Kardashians, Gigi and Bella Hadid, and Hailey Bieber, who love it and have helped make it mainstream. Beige coats no longer rule, nude has taken over sweatpants, satin bra tops, and close-fitting Lycra dresses! There’s a greater choice of fabrics, both matte and shiny. However, the colour isn’t easy to pair with others and is more easily worn in a monochrome total look.”

Image Title
Image Title
Image Title
Image Title
Image Title