Every body is right

all editorials

Every body is right

Plus size fashion is no longer a niche market. On the contrary, it now symbolizes the progress of the body positivity movement, which entails greater diversity and the end of restrictions and established norms. The movement is championed by superstar models and engaged brands. Let’s take a look. 

Does this groundswell movement signal an end to hang-ups? In any case, it coincides with the feminist demands expressed by the young generation: a call for more diversity, inclusivity and fluidity.

Until very recently, slim – almost emaciated – women showed off their angular figures in advertising campaigns and on every catwalk. Fashion was made for the thin, and there was nothing more to be said, which completely ignored the multitude of women over size 36. But today, the revolution seems to be gaining ground, and a wide diversity of shapes are taking their place on the fashion scene. The number of plus size models is growing. At the top of the list, Paloma Elsesser, with her voluptuous curves and pouty baby face, has stepped confidently into the spotlight in numerous advertising campaigns. She’s also on almost all the runways and extremely popular on Instagram (526k followers). The young woman claims she is giving a face and figure to the body positivity movement. But she’s not the only one, far from it. There’s Ashley Graham, Jill Kortleve, and Odile Gautreau in France … and then celebrities in general, such as Beyoncé, Lizzo, Yseult and even Kim Kardashian, who have been pushing boundaries for years and changing how women are portrayed.

In response, more and more brands are offering clothing in a large range of sizes and creating the latest fashions for their full-figured customers. At Make My Lemonade, it’s, in fact, one of the foundations of the brand’s identity. “We know that each body is different, and it’s the quirks that make it beautiful because they tell its story,” explains designer Lisa Gachet on the website. “That’s why we pay special attention to cuts and to the sizes we offer, going from 34 to 52.” Today, brands like Ba&sh, Bensimon, Weill and Elise Chalmin present a much wider choice of sizes.

That might seem like an obvious move, but in the fashion industry it’s a little revolution!

Producing garments in more sizes means rethinking an entire collection plan and sometimes changing the business model. Should a brand produce fewer designs, but make them available in all sizes? Should garments be designed to easily adapt to every morphology? The latter approach is, for example, the one chosen by the young label Ester Manas, a rising star. Through an ingenious use of fastening systems and fabrics, the pieces can adjust to every figure. The project is called quite simply One Size Fits All. Mapoésie’s clothes also come in only one size, but the cuts are designed to adapt to every – or almost every – shape.

Another idea – a very disruptive one – is the Fit Liberty program developed by the Universal Standard label. The program lets shoppers, at no charge, exchange a garment if they change sizes, it’s both clever and takes away the guilt! Does this groundswell movement signal an end to hang-ups? In any case, it coincides with the feminist demands expressed by the young generation: a call for more diversity, inclusivity and fluidity. And plus size fashion tells the story of this liberation.

+ trend consultant Feriel Karoui shares her analysis.

“Young women today value diversity and uniqueness. They don’t want to be put into categories. The fact that they choose unisex clothing – new or vintage – made for all body types, shows that they want, most of all, to express themselves and show their creativity. They especially don’t want to be assigned one or more styles deemed as normal. What’s important seems to be the feeling the garment brings, it doesn’t matter if it’s XS or XXL. It’s reassuring that fashion is absorbing and supporting this movement.”

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© Make My Lemonade

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© Ba&sh

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© Mapoésie

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© Make My Lemonade

all editorials

Every body is right

Plus size fashion is no longer a niche market. On the contrary, it now symbolizes the progress of the body positivity movement, which entails greater diversity and the end of restrictions and established norms. The movement is championed by superstar models and engaged brands. Let’s take a look. 

Does this groundswell movement signal an end to hang-ups? In any case, it coincides with the feminist demands expressed by the young generation: a call for more diversity, inclusivity and fluidity.

Until very recently, slim – almost emaciated – women showed off their angular figures in advertising campaigns and on every catwalk. Fashion was made for the thin, and there was nothing more to be said, which completely ignored the multitude of women over size 36. But today, the revolution seems to be gaining ground, and a wide diversity of shapes are taking their place on the fashion scene. The number of plus size models is growing. At the top of the list, Paloma Elsesser, with her voluptuous curves and pouty baby face, has stepped confidently into the spotlight in numerous advertising campaigns. She’s also on almost all the runways and extremely popular on Instagram (526k followers). The young woman claims she is giving a face and figure to the body positivity movement. But she’s not the only one, far from it. There’s Ashley Graham, Jill Kortleve, and Odile Gautreau in France … and then celebrities in general, such as Beyoncé, Lizzo, Yseult and even Kim Kardashian, who have been pushing boundaries for years and changing how women are portrayed.

In response, more and more brands are offering clothing in a large range of sizes and creating the latest fashions for their full-figured customers. At Make My Lemonade, it’s, in fact, one of the foundations of the brand’s identity. “We know that each body is different, and it’s the quirks that make it beautiful because they tell its story,” explains designer Lisa Gachet on the website. “That’s why we pay special attention to cuts and to the sizes we offer, going from 34 to 52.” Today, brands like Ba&sh, Bensimon, Weill and Elise Chalmin present a much wider choice of sizes.

That might seem like an obvious move, but in the fashion industry it’s a little revolution!

Producing garments in more sizes means rethinking an entire collection plan and sometimes changing the business model. Should a brand produce fewer designs, but make them available in all sizes? Should garments be designed to easily adapt to every morphology? The latter approach is, for example, the one chosen by the young label Ester Manas, a rising star. Through an ingenious use of fastening systems and fabrics, the pieces can adjust to every figure. The project is called quite simply One Size Fits All. Mapoésie’s clothes also come in only one size, but the cuts are designed to adapt to every – or almost every – shape.

Another idea – a very disruptive one – is the Fit Liberty program developed by the Universal Standard label. The program lets shoppers, at no charge, exchange a garment if they change sizes, it’s both clever and takes away the guilt! Does this groundswell movement signal an end to hang-ups? In any case, it coincides with the feminist demands expressed by the young generation: a call for more diversity, inclusivity and fluidity. And plus size fashion tells the story of this liberation.

+ trend consultant Feriel Karoui shares her analysis.

“Young women today value diversity and uniqueness. They don’t want to be put into categories. The fact that they choose unisex clothing – new or vintage – made for all body types, shows that they want, most of all, to express themselves and show their creativity. They especially don’t want to be assigned one or more styles deemed as normal. What’s important seems to be the feeling the garment brings, it doesn’t matter if it’s XS or XXL. It’s reassuring that fashion is absorbing and supporting this movement.”

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