Party time!

all editorials

Party time!

Wedding dresses and other special occasion outfits are no longer just for specific events in our lives.  Starting now, they’re part of real wardrobes, where they mix fearlessly with basic pieces. They symbolize our desire to get back to having fun and reconnect with a certain flamboyance.

We’ve never seen such an appetite for original, dramatic, almost pompous clothing

For a long time, the clothes called “occasion wear” seemed to be in a separate category far from Fashion Weeks’ thrilling catwalks or fashion’s trends. But today that’s no longer the case, and the revolution seems to be moving forward. An increasing number of young houses are starting out in this once-niche sector, and they’re taking the most open approach possible.

What is this current mood about? The idea is that the clothes we buy for a special event should no longer just be one-night stands. They should keep on being useful and find new places to be worn. This is the core philosophy of brands like Rime Arodaky, who design wedding dresses that can be easily worn for a chic, summertime bohemian evening. Maison Lemoine is also very clear about its mission to create clothing that can be worn again and again. And Les Jupons de Louison designs pieces to fit each client, giving formal clothing an inclusive touch.

Is this trend at odds with an era of fast fashion and the tyranny of sweat pants and tennis shoes? No, in fact the opposite is true since we’ve never seen such an appetite for original, dramatic, almost pompous clothing. After years of sportswear’s unrivalled reign – which climaxed during the quarantines and health crisis – could we now be ready to say goodbye to floppy, basic and comfortable? That’s the claim of the numerous designers who have been showing party-time silhouettes as antidotes to gloom in recent seasons.

Their irresistible arguments: complex designs, precious fabrics, brocades, crystals, laces, flounces, silks, sequins and more. These are outfits for going out, having a good time and being seen. They’re meant to be noticed at social events and to make a strong impression from head to toes. They’re a far cry from the Zoom and Teams encounters that reduced us to a bland head and shoulders with tired faces under blue light.

In addition, shows set in the past are what’s popular now. Series like Bridgerton continue to fascinate us (Bridgerton season 2 will be aired on Netflix), and Downtown Abbey has been made into a second movie. What do they have in common? They’ve successfully made pop protocol and the aristocracy sexy, with their quota of fancy dresses and ritualized events. The result is that these series have had an influence on our modern-day desires. This is proven by today’s stars who are ready to play the role of grande dame 2.0, as seen at the last Met Gala ceremony.

Modernity is perhaps also present in the ability to mix codes and references and to confidently wear a long vintage dress with sneakers or a chic blazer over jeans with holes. What’s important is to show off one’s flamboyance and panache. Maybe formal wear is finally getting its revenge.

+ Claire Savary Haour, trend consultant and founder of the Liberté collective, shares her analysis.

“Being over-dressed is becoming popular again. After the (lengthy) health crisis which prevented us from having a social life, we want opportunities for getting dressed up and showing off and going all out. In fashion, the vintage aesthetic is also in sync with a longing to return to rituals and social mores that may be more defined. Parties and ceremonies, with their clearly designated dress codes, are the essence of that. And then, we’re fans of well-made clothing, savoir-faire, made to measure and durability – all qualities these exceptional pieces provide.”

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© Rime Arodaky

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© Maison Lemoine

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© Les Jupons de Louison

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© Maison Lemoine

all editorials

Party time!

Wedding dresses and other special occasion outfits are no longer just for specific events in our lives.  Starting now, they’re part of real wardrobes, where they mix fearlessly with basic pieces. They symbolize our desire to get back to having fun and reconnect with a certain flamboyance.

We’ve never seen such an appetite for original, dramatic, almost pompous clothing

For a long time, the clothes called “occasion wear” seemed to be in a separate category far from Fashion Weeks’ thrilling catwalks or fashion’s trends. But today that’s no longer the case, and the revolution seems to be moving forward. An increasing number of young houses are starting out in this once-niche sector, and they’re taking the most open approach possible.

What is this current mood about? The idea is that the clothes we buy for a special event should no longer just be one-night stands. They should keep on being useful and find new places to be worn. This is the core philosophy of brands like Rime Arodaky, who design wedding dresses that can be easily worn for a chic, summertime bohemian evening. Maison Lemoine is also very clear about its mission to create clothing that can be worn again and again. And Les Jupons de Louison designs pieces to fit each client, giving formal clothing an inclusive touch.

Is this trend at odds with an era of fast fashion and the tyranny of sweat pants and tennis shoes? No, in fact the opposite is true since we’ve never seen such an appetite for original, dramatic, almost pompous clothing. After years of sportswear’s unrivalled reign – which climaxed during the quarantines and health crisis – could we now be ready to say goodbye to floppy, basic and comfortable? That’s the claim of the numerous designers who have been showing party-time silhouettes as antidotes to gloom in recent seasons.

Their irresistible arguments: complex designs, precious fabrics, brocades, crystals, laces, flounces, silks, sequins and more. These are outfits for going out, having a good time and being seen. They’re meant to be noticed at social events and to make a strong impression from head to toes. They’re a far cry from the Zoom and Teams encounters that reduced us to a bland head and shoulders with tired faces under blue light.

In addition, shows set in the past are what’s popular now. Series like Bridgerton continue to fascinate us (Bridgerton season 2 will be aired on Netflix), and Downtown Abbey has been made into a second movie. What do they have in common? They’ve successfully made pop protocol and the aristocracy sexy, with their quota of fancy dresses and ritualized events. The result is that these series have had an influence on our modern-day desires. This is proven by today’s stars who are ready to play the role of grande dame 2.0, as seen at the last Met Gala ceremony.

Modernity is perhaps also present in the ability to mix codes and references and to confidently wear a long vintage dress with sneakers or a chic blazer over jeans with holes. What’s important is to show off one’s flamboyance and panache. Maybe formal wear is finally getting its revenge.

+ Claire Savary Haour, trend consultant and founder of the Liberté collective, shares her analysis.

“Being over-dressed is becoming popular again. After the (lengthy) health crisis which prevented us from having a social life, we want opportunities for getting dressed up and showing off and going all out. In fashion, the vintage aesthetic is also in sync with a longing to return to rituals and social mores that may be more defined. Parties and ceremonies, with their clearly designated dress codes, are the essence of that. And then, we’re fans of well-made clothing, savoir-faire, made to measure and durability – all qualities these exceptional pieces provide.”

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