Total Denim

all editorials

Total Denim

Jeans, for a long time relegated to the role of a basic, are back with a bang … and a big dose of creativity! Now produced with more virtuous methods, all-over denim is an important look with cutting-edge, experimental charm. It’s also part of the Y2K revival so popular with millennials. To summarize, jeans are the go-everywhere solution for contemporary wardrobes.

Of course, today it’s still cool, but it’s got a new energy. Just one kind of fabric and the uniform vibe are over. Long live artistic jeans!

Total-look denim had fallen out of fashion, one of the slightly kitsch memories from the end of the 90s (do Britney Spears and Justin Timberlake in matching all-denim outfits on the red carpet ring a bell?). But it took just one image to rekindle desire and reignite the imagination:  Kayne West and his then-girlfriend Julia Fox showing up for Paris Men’s Fashion Week in January, both outfitted from head-to-toes in denim.

And every catwalk seemed to echo the message, sending out all-blue looks with incredible allure and saving the traditional fabric from an over-used interpretation where is sometimes stagnated. This season, new ideas abound more than ever. Kaporal introduces 30% eco-responsible jeans, paying careful attention to signature details such as topstitching and patch pockets. Leon & Harper opts for retro style with a sleeveless jeans jacket that’s just right for a 1980’s teenage heroine. Patine’s Italian denim, which uses no new cotton, has timeless charm. Then there are Roseanna’s overshirts, perfect for modern cowgirls to pair with denim bottoms. And finally, Sessùn continues its Sessùn Blue collection, playing with big patches and over-dyeing.

The message is clear, jeans are no longer a boring basic. For a long time they belonged to the American workforce, with the total-look version made popular by singer Bing Crosby who liked to wear his Levi Strauss jeans and shirt together. In the 50s and 60s, a multitude of American celebrities, from Elvis Presley to James Dean, made jeans their uniform. First a symbol of cool, jeans next became the perfect attire for relaxed weekends. From the 90s to the 2000s, denim underwent every extreme, becoming grunge and rebellious. Then it fell – very low – on the hips of it girls and the in crowd.

Of course, today it’s still cool, but it’s got a new energy. Just one kind of fabric and the uniform vibe are over. Long live artistic jeans! For quite some time, and not just on Fridays, they’ve taken over other territories. Now all-over denim goes to chic soirées, walks the red carpet and attends cocktails and even formal events. Nothing is off limits. After years of sportswear and omnipresent fluid fabrics, denim is again the star thanks to its rigid, structured qualities. As a complete look, it creates powerful shapes that can sometimes seem like armour. For millennials, a generation raised on sweatpants and sweatshirts, it even has a vintage appeal, which is completely on-trend. In fact, designers are now trying to make denim as virtuous as possible, correcting its often justified reputation as an ecological disaster. The future of jeans looks bright … and all blue.

+ Thomas Zylberman, a trend expert with the Carlin Creative Trend Bureau, shares his analysis.

“Wearing total-look denim is a strong, clear statement with a huge visual impact. For the in-fashion version, you can add accessories, boots, bodysuits and bags for an even bolder effect, almost like a shell. A different attitude is the nod to Y2K, the term for the 2000s-inspired style movement. In that case, denim is linked to the California it girls like Paris Hilton or Nicole Richie. Those jeans are hip huggers worn with a very tight top, bodysuit or crop top. The message is one of hedonism and very confident sexuality.”

Image Title

© Roseanna

Image Title

© Patine

Image Title

© Sessún

Image Title

© Sessún

all editorials

Total Denim

Jeans, for a long time relegated to the role of a basic, are back with a bang … and a big dose of creativity! Now produced with more virtuous methods, all-over denim is an important look with cutting-edge, experimental charm. It’s also part of the Y2K revival so popular with millennials. To summarize, jeans are the go-everywhere solution for contemporary wardrobes.

Of course, today it’s still cool, but it’s got a new energy. Just one kind of fabric and the uniform vibe are over. Long live artistic jeans!

Total-look denim had fallen out of fashion, one of the slightly kitsch memories from the end of the 90s (do Britney Spears and Justin Timberlake in matching all-denim outfits on the red carpet ring a bell?). But it took just one image to rekindle desire and reignite the imagination:  Kayne West and his then-girlfriend Julia Fox showing up for Paris Men’s Fashion Week in January, both outfitted from head-to-toes in denim.

And every catwalk seemed to echo the message, sending out all-blue looks with incredible allure and saving the traditional fabric from an over-used interpretation where is sometimes stagnated. This season, new ideas abound more than ever. Kaporal introduces 30% eco-responsible jeans, paying careful attention to signature details such as topstitching and patch pockets. Leon & Harper opts for retro style with a sleeveless jeans jacket that’s just right for a 1980’s teenage heroine. Patine’s Italian denim, which uses no new cotton, has timeless charm. Then there are Roseanna’s overshirts, perfect for modern cowgirls to pair with denim bottoms. And finally, Sessùn continues its Sessùn Blue collection, playing with big patches and over-dyeing.

The message is clear, jeans are no longer a boring basic. For a long time they belonged to the American workforce, with the total-look version made popular by singer Bing Crosby who liked to wear his Levi Strauss jeans and shirt together. In the 50s and 60s, a multitude of American celebrities, from Elvis Presley to James Dean, made jeans their uniform. First a symbol of cool, jeans next became the perfect attire for relaxed weekends. From the 90s to the 2000s, denim underwent every extreme, becoming grunge and rebellious. Then it fell – very low – on the hips of it girls and the in crowd.

Of course, today it’s still cool, but it’s got a new energy. Just one kind of fabric and the uniform vibe are over. Long live artistic jeans! For quite some time, and not just on Fridays, they’ve taken over other territories. Now all-over denim goes to chic soirées, walks the red carpet and attends cocktails and even formal events. Nothing is off limits. After years of sportswear and omnipresent fluid fabrics, denim is again the star thanks to its rigid, structured qualities. As a complete look, it creates powerful shapes that can sometimes seem like armour. For millennials, a generation raised on sweatpants and sweatshirts, it even has a vintage appeal, which is completely on-trend. In fact, designers are now trying to make denim as virtuous as possible, correcting its often justified reputation as an ecological disaster. The future of jeans looks bright … and all blue.

+ Thomas Zylberman, a trend expert with the Carlin Creative Trend Bureau, shares his analysis.

“Wearing total-look denim is a strong, clear statement with a huge visual impact. For the in-fashion version, you can add accessories, boots, bodysuits and bags for an even bolder effect, almost like a shell. A different attitude is the nod to Y2K, the term for the 2000s-inspired style movement. In that case, denim is linked to the California it girls like Paris Hilton or Nicole Richie. Those jeans are hip huggers worn with a very tight top, bodysuit or crop top. The message is one of hedonism and very confident sexuality.”

Image Title
Image Title
Image Title
Image Title